Quantum nanodiamonds may help detect disease earlier

The quantum sensing abilities of nanodiamonds can be used to improve the sensitivity of paper-based diagnostic tests, potentially allowing for earlier detection of diseases such as HIV, according to a study led by UCL researchers in the i-sense McKendry group. Paper-based lateral flow tests work the same way as a pregnancy test in that a…Continue Reading

CCNY team in quantum algorithm breakthrough

The Google Quantum Computer. Credit: Google Quantum AI Researchers led by City College of New York physicist Pouyan Ghaemi report the development of a quantum algorithm with the potential to study a class of many-electron quantums system using quantum computers. Their paper, entitled “Creating and Manipulating a Laughlin-Type ν=1/3 Fractional Quantum Hall State on a…Continue Reading

Quantum Mechanics and General Relativity Come Together: Astrophysicists Observe Long-Theorized Quantum Phenomena

Planetary nebula NGC 2440’s central star, HD62166, is possibly the hottest known white dwarf star discovered yet. White dwarfs exhibit puzzling quantum phenomena: As they gain mass, they shrink in size. Credit: NASA/JPL/STScI/AURA A team led by students probes the mass-radius relation of white dwarf stars, observing in their data evidence of quantum mechanics and…Continue Reading

What Quantum Computing Could Mean for Software Development

Once the stuff of speculation, the growth of quantum software development may share some similarities with the rise of MLOps and AIOps.Last week, during Quantum.Tech Digital’s virtual Quantum Thursday sessions, a group of stakeholders from IBM, Harvard, Goldman Sachs, and the startup scene discussed scaling up and maturing quantum software development. Talk of quantum computing…Continue Reading

‘Quantum negativity’ can power ultra-precise measurements

Scientists have found that a physical property called ‘quantum negativity’ can be used to take more precise measurements of everything from molecular distances to gravitational waves. The researchers, from the University of Cambridge, Harvard and MIT, have shown that quantum particles can carry an unlimited amount of information about things they have interacted with. The…Continue Reading

Simulating quantum ‘time travel’ disproves butterfly effect in quantum realm

Using a quantum computer to simulate time travel, researchers have demonstrated that, in the quantum realm, there is no “butterfly effect.” In the research, information — qubits, or quantum bits — “time travel” into the simulated past. One of them is then strongly damaged, like stepping on a butterfly, metaphorically speaking. Surprisingly, when all qubits…Continue Reading

Scientists make quantum technology smaller

A way of shrinking the devices used in quantum sensing systems has been developed by researchers at the UK Quantum Technology Hub Sensors and Timing, which is led by the University of Birmingham. Sensing devices have a huge number of industrial uses, from carrying out ground surveys to monitoring volcanoes. Scientists working on ways to…Continue Reading

New Ideas From Quantum Theory Could Herald a Revolution

Original artwork by Ludmila Odintsova, Author provided Lasers were created 60 years ago this year, when three different laser devices were unveiled by independent laboratories in the United States. A few years later, one of these inventors called the unusual light sources “a solution seeking a problem”. Today, the laser has been applied to countless…Continue Reading

New technology lets quantum bits hold information for 10,000 times longer than previous record

Quantum bits, or qubits, can hold quantum information much longer now thanks to efforts by an international research team. The researchers have increased the retention time, or coherence time, to 10 milliseconds — 10,000 times longer than the previous record — by combining the orbital motion and spinning inside an atom. Such a boost in…Continue Reading

A question of quantum reality

Credit: Pixabay/CC0 Public Domain Physicist Reinhold Bertlmann of the University of Vienna, Austria has published a review of the work of his late long-term collaborator John Stewart Bell of CERN, Geneva in EPJ H. This review, “Real or Not Real: that is the question,” explores Bell’s inequalities and his concepts of reality and explains their…Continue Reading